Tabby at rehoming centre
Every day, unwanted and abandoned animals are rescued into our rehoming centres, totally dependent on the care our charities provide to give them the best chance of a safe and secure future

It was recently International Homeless Animals Day which aims to educate people about pet abandonment, feral animals and benefits of neutering your pets.

In 2018 the funds raised by Together for Animals helped our members rescue and rehome 10,000 unwanted or abandoned cats, dogs, donkeys and horses in need. These were cared for in 37 rehoming centres across England, Scotland and Wales.

For whatever reason an animal finds itself in a rehoming centre, they may be there for weeks or many months. During this time they will receive veterinary treatment and check-ups, behavioural evaluation, socialisation and playtime. This will help us to understand what they will need in their future home, before hopefully being matched with their new family who will love and care for them.

Sadly, some animals require a lot of help and care when they arrive at a rehoming centre.

Tiny kittens Stevie and Munroe were brought to our member Blue Cross’ Grimsby hospital in Lincolnshire in July 2018 after being found abandoned on the streets of the town. They were suffering from severe diarrhoea, which had left them terribly sick, frail and weighing just a third of a kilo.

The vets and nurses gave them emergency treatment and, once they were well enough, they were transferred to their Lewknor rehoming centre in Oxfordshire to find a home, but sadly Stevie and Munroe suffered another setback. They underwent a number of tests that were all negative, and their illness remained a mystery.

Their only hope lay in treatment for a nasty parasite called tritrichomonas – they had already tested negative for this, but false results are possible, so the vet team felt that it was worth a shot. The medication had to be specially imported and the vets had to wait until Stevie and Munroe were three months old before they could receive treatment due to the possible side effects of the medication.

In the end, three courses of treatment were needed – the highest number of courses of the treatment the team had ever seen needed. Throughout it all, the brothers had to remain in isolation to prevent the infection spreading; this meant that they were confined to their pens and could only be handled by staff wearing protective clothing and gloves.

The time, effort and cost involved in the brothers’ care were all worth it to be able to help such sick kittens recover, giving them a chance to live a long and healthy life.

We’re delighted to say that after more than 230 days in Blue Cross care, both Stevie and Munroe are now healthy and living happily in the loving homes they deserve.

Together for Animals raises vital funds for five leading animal welfare charities, helping care for over 350,000 pets and working animals each year. To find out more please visit our website www.togetherforanimals.org.uk.