Tracey (mum), Chloe and John Milne (dad)
The world-leading William Quarrier Scottish Epilepsy Centre (WQSEC) has been awarded a 5 star ‘Recognised for Excellence’ accolade from Quality Scotland – the highest available.

The European Quality Foundation Managements (EFQM) ‘Recognised for Excellence’ is awarded to organisations that demonstrate high levels of performance which engage and motivate staff across all levels as well as a commitment to on-going improvement and development.

The Glasgow-based independent hospital, managed by health and social care charity Quarriers, is the only residential assessment and treatment centre in Scotland for adults with epilepsy and has state of the art facilities with world-class diagnostic technology.

The accolade was earned following an intensive four-day assessment and the Centre was presented with a five-star award – the highest grading possible.

The Centre also received good practice awards for ‘Creating a Sustainable Future’ as well as ‘Harnessing Creativity and Innovation’ which recognise the groundbreaking work carried out by the award-winning team.

Tracey (mum) and Chloe Milne

Alice Harper, Chief Executive of Quarriers, said:

“This is a great achievement for the Scottish Epilepsy Centre and is a testament to the hard work and dedication of each and every member of the team who played their part.

“The Centre is recognised as being world-leading and this award underlines the importance of its work in supporting people with epilepsy from across Scotland and beyond.”

Claire Ford, CEO of Quality Scotland, said:

“Congratulations to The Scottish Epilepsy Centre on achieving 5 star ‘Recognised for Excellence’.

“This highest level of EFQM global recognition is a clear demonstration that excellence and continuous improvement is at the heart of the organisation.”

Every day the specialist centre supports people with epilepsy to manage their condition and live their best possible lives and one person whose life has benefitted is 25-year-old Chloe Milne from Aberdeen.

Chloe has epilepsy and lives with complex disabilities, but since being referred to the WQSEC her family has seen a significant improvement in her condition.

Things got to breaking point towards the end of 2018 when Chloe’s seizures were becoming increasingly erratic and her family were unsure what to do. After speaking to their Consultant Neurologist about their concerns, Chloe was referred to the WQSEC.

With over 45 different types of epilepsy, it is a complex condition to diagnose but the staff at the Centre were able to explain the different types of seizures Chloe was having and this level of knowledge made Chloe and her mum, Tracey, more confident.

The Centre’s first priority was to review the anti-epileptic medication Chloe was on and monitor her seizure activity in a safe and controlled environment. Staff quickly made the necessary changes to Chloe’s treatment, keeping her under close observation to keep a check on her progress.

An inpatient for five weeks, Chloe spent three weeks before Christmas 2018 and two weeks in the New Year at the Centre, allowing her and her family a break to go home for Christmas. Initially, Tracey and Chloe were apprehensive about being so far from home for a number of weeks but they researched the Centre online to see the facilities offered.

Speaking about her and her daughter’s experience at WQSEC Tracey (41) said:

“The Centre not only has excellent specialist facilities but the addition of an adjoining Carers Rooms meant I could join Chloe throughout her stay giving me peace of mind as I was near her and could provide reassurance whenever she needed it. We settled in quickly and before long, it felt like home and didn’t feel like a hospital.”

Lorraine Jackson, Interim Head of Service explains the support offered. She said:

“Chloe is very much part of a supportive family. She has never been away from her family and to be able to offer facilities to enable both Chloe and her Mum to stay together was vital in ensuring that Chloe got the best chance to have her epilepsy assessed and treated. What we find at the Centre is that when we provide a service that is responsive to individual needs, we are able to offer the best outcomes for patients.”

Commenting further, Tracey said:

“The William Quarrier Scottish Epilepsy Centre has really improved Chloe’s epilepsy and I would recommend other people requiring specialist support with diagnosis and management of epilepsy to speak to their Neurologist about a referral.

“Being at the Centre gave me a new perspective and as a family, we feel better equipped to look after Chloe as we know more about the support that is available. As a way to say thank you, my family and I recently took part in the Aberdeen Kiltwalk to raise funds for the Centre.”

If you or a loved one would benefit from an inpatient assessment, please discuss this with your consultant associated with your epilepsy.

For further information about The William Quarrier Scottish Epilepsy Centre please visit http://scottishepilepsycentre.org.uk/ or email scottishepilepsycentre@quarriers.org.uk