Charity launched in memory of murdered man

James Brindley was killed last year

A new charity has been set up by a family who had their lives ‘shattered’ when their 26-year-old son was stabbed to death just yards from their home.

The James Brindley Full Circle (Offender Management) Programme, they said has helped them to focus and find strength following his tragic death.

17-year-old convicted murderer Ammar Kahrod

James Brindley was walking home on June 23 last year when he was attacked and stabbed by 17-year-old Ammar Kahrod.

The 35-second random attack took place in Aldridge, Walsall.

In court, the killer claimed the evil act was of self-defence, but a jury convicted the teen of murder in February.

Earlier this year lawyers for Kahrod, of Walsall Road, Aldridge, appealed against his 17-year sentence claiming it was too harsh.

But senior judges quashed the appeal and ruled the sentence was justified for a murder committed by an offender who had taken a knife onto the streets.

He must serve the entire 17 years before being eligible for parole.

Now James’s parents Mark and Beverley Brindley – alongside their daughter Charlotte – are getting ready to launch a new initiative at the Town Hall in Walsall next month, in their son’s memory.

Introducing the programme, James’s father Mark said: “The last fifteen months of our shattered lives have been the worst imaginable, during which time, we have lurched from the trauma of the event itself, to utter disbelief and denial, and also plumbed the depths of despair and hopelessness at his loss.

“We recognise that we have a lifelong journey of healing ahead of us, helped by those around us who care. Our families, friends, the church and the wonderful community of Aldridge have all played a central role in our recovery to date. We are moving forwards again, united by a shared need, to create a powerful and lasting legacy for good, in James’s name. We have found that legacy.

“The Full Circle programme provides us with a perfect opportunity to make a huge positive difference in society because it addresses the causes of anti-social behaviour, that can lead to violent crime. Our aspiration to grow the programme to national status gives us the focus and strength to move our lives forwards again and is an essential part of our lifelong healing.”